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Home arrow CINEMA arrow [73.MOSTRA] Intervista a Deepak Rauniyar
[73.MOSTRA] Intervista a Deepak Rauniyar
di Marisa Santin   

28170-white_sun_-_director_deepak_rauniyar.jpegDo you believe that a look from the outside on your own country helped you understand and narrate Nepal in a different perspective?
Other than participation on labs organized by Berlinale, TIFF or Rotterdam film festivals, I do not actually have formal educational experience abroad. But for the past couple of years, I’ve been partly living in New York, and being far from home has helped me to see things in a different perspective. Especially it really helped me to write my main protagonist, Agni. My love for Agni was constantly challenged by the day-by-day transformation of the Nepal Communist Party (Maoist) and its leader, all those news around me! So, isolating myself in New York from all those events in Nepal, as Agni had in his life, helped me to be more focused on him and to love him.

 

 

A girl and her father reunitedby the death of the grandfather. How can a story of intergenerational exchange help us understand transformation in present-day Nepal?
War is never good! It shouldn’t have happened. But it did. Many people lost their lives, home, family, land, wealth, and especially hope! Then, it also brought some good things. Nepal not only became a democratic republic and ended the era of the king's rule, but it also became a secular country. It adopted a new political federal structure. To some extent it broke the feudal, hierarchical structure of the society. Gender role changed. Women’s independence grew. The village I grew up isn’t the same anymore! Though the film's character Chitra’s generation may only see how bad things are! Though Agni may be questioning either war he fought was worth it. Suraj could try to prove that it was all wrong! But Durga today is a different person! The pot seller isn’t the same lower caste man anymore! Pooja and Amrit are the young generation after the war. What I felt, an exchange between these all people, could not only help us understand the full picture, but it will help them understand each other, develop respect and understanding for one another.


How is war portrayed in the film?
I didn’t want White Sun to be a sad film about the war. I wanted to see a positive take aways from a horrible past, and how we could all move forward. Something we can all live for. Life must go on.

 

 

:agenda cinema