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Home arrow CINEMA arrow [73.MOSTRA] Intervista a Kei Ishikawa
[73.MOSTRA] Intervista a Kei Ishikawa
di Marisa Santin   

32376-gukoroku__traces_of_sin__-_director_kei_ishikawa_1.jpgYou graduated at Poland’s Lodz Film School. The film cinematographer is Polish, too. How much your European experience influenced our work and the way you describe Japan?
I never intended to add any European influences to my film(s). I just did what I knew on the set. But anyway, what I knew was European style filmmaking, so of course my European study influenced in that way. Probably the way I describe Japan changed a lot. I always had subjective and objective eyes to look at the country and the culture. For European people, Japan sometimes looks exotic but for Japanese, everything looks normal. I’m totally in between. I don’t want to judge it as good or bad, but I needed to stand in between to tell this story properly.

 

 

Is there a universal theme in the film? And what aspects are, in turn, typical of Japanese society?
In general, I believe everything in the film is universal. This is the main point actually because the main theme of the film is to make the audience feel “it’s also my story”. The direct translation of the title is “a catalogue of follies”. We tried to make a catalogue of follies of
each character. In the end, we see our protagonist’s folly but after the screen turns to black, I want to add one more person to the catalogue, “you” or “someone around you”.

 

A journalistic investigation and a mystery to solve: what directors and what films inspired your first feature?

Denis Villeneuve’s Incendies and Michael Haneke’s Cache.

 

 

:agenda cinema