VeneziaNews :venews

  • Venezia News
  • Venezia News
  • Venezia News
  • Venezia News
  • Venezia News
Home arrow CINEMA arrow [73.MOSTRA] Intervista a Gastón Solnicki
[73.MOSTRA] Intervista a Gastón Solnicki
di Andrea Falco   

img_3866.jpgDo you think recession can be an inner state of the soul, or of the mind?
Starting light, eh? I never thought of it that way, and to think Argentina is a very psychoanalytic society in my opinion. I am under the impression that we are more acquainted with recession as being a state of the economy, not a neurosis, which has more direct causes. At any rate, I wouldn’t be surprised if different audiences saw different storylines that I myself couldn’t see. It is certainly related, alienation is all around our post-capitalist economy. When I started making this film, I didn’t know what I was getting into. I wanted to use Bartók and the setting of Punta del Este, in Uruguay, where I spent all summers as a child. I feel this sense of decay of contemporary world was highly cinematic and it showed in the contradiction of a place that is supposed to be a paradise but one we were kind of trapped in. A sense of false, superficial comfort. That’s where I found the connection between the validation of the characters and their relations.

 

 

How hard and how painful is it to detach ourselves from the things we thought we own but actually don't?
It is a natural process. Ultimately, I don’t see it as painful but as a consequence of a fallacy common to so many people: they try to go against the natural process, the natural instinct, to fight them. In the long run, though, you will find you are only  detaching from yourself, layer after layer. That doesn’t mean it is inappropriate to own and use things, the tragic point is that parents who had a tougher youth couldn’t realize how poisonous their support, in good conscience, could have been for their children. The central subjectmatter of the movie is alienation in a group of adolescents. It’s about finding what is theirs and what is not. It is painful, yes, it is as testing as a resurrection, a rebirth can be. A transcendental life experience. You have to locate where you are with respect to work, desires, relationships… and how imprisoned you may be in a context such as the one you were born into. I try to picture that very moment when you start to release yourself form the chains of upbringing. Parents are nice, they try to do their best, but it’s complicated by the fact that they can’t walk your path, they can’t live your life on your behalf. This realization and what it entails may be painful.

 

Who is Bluebeard?
Bluebeard is a legend that pops up in several places in culture. We may say that the myth of Judith and Holofernes is one of his first appearances. In the story – he is a monster, but in the opera – I see him as a more of a victim. He is a complex character that can be interpreted in different ways. In the film, there is no such character. The audience will find they themselves have to play the part of Bluebeard or the part of Judith, participating quite actively in the movie.

 

 

 

:agenda cinema